Home Economics

  • Professor Guendolyn A. Beeler, Chairman
  • Assistant Professors R. Harris, Jamison, M. H. Jones

Welcome to the Home Economics major!

 

  • IMPORTANT!  As of June, 1968, the conferring of the degree of Bachelor of Science in Home Economics will be discontinued. Entering freshmen, 1965-1966, will not be permitted to apply for any major program directed towards a degree in Home Economics. Students who are following a major program at present should refer to the catalogue of 1964-1965 or the catalogue issued when admitted to Mary Washington College, for information concerning the requirements of their respective programs.
  • Courses in home economics are available as electives for students in any curriculum. However, not more than twelve semester hours’ credit in vocational subjects (home economics and/or education) may be taken.

 

Courses available:

100-level

  • Home Economics 104. International Foods. Food preparation and food customs of the people of other countries. One single and two double periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mrs. Harris
  • Home Economics 112. Art of Costume Selection. A study of color and line in dress as adapted to individual build, coloring and personality. Consideration of the work of the fashion world. Historical influences noted. Two single periods a week. Two credits. Mrs. Jamison.

200-level

  • Home Economics 211, 212. Contemporary Costume. A study of twentieth century clothing in relation to the aesthetic, socio-psychological, economic, and historical factors influencing the production and consumption of wearing apparel for the satisfaction of human wants. The laboratory work involves planning and construction of designs. One single and two double periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mrs. Jamison.
  • Home Economics 221, 222. Food Selection and Preparation. Elements of nutrition with reference to the nutritive needs of individuals, food economics, fundamental principles of food preparation, evaluation and service. One single and two double periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mrs. Harris.
  • Home Economics 231. Nutrition. Principles of human nutrition and how such knowledge may be utilized to prevent ill health and promote a high level of physical fitness. Two single and one double period a week. Three credits each semester. Mrs. Harris.

300-level

  • Home Economics 311. Tailoring. A study of the principles and practices involved in the tailoring of women’s coats and suits. Custom tailoring techniques used. One single and two double periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mrs. Jamison.
  • Home Economics 312. Textiles. An introduction to textile chemistry, with emphasis on the physical, microscopical, and chemical analysis of fibers, yarns, weaves and finishes in relation to fabrics. An investigation of research and recent development sin textiles and textile technology. Two single periods and one double period a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mrs. Jamison.
  • Home Economics 333. Equipment. Problems in selection, use, and care of institutional and household equipment. Development and evaluation of kitchen, lighting, and wiring plans. Two double periods and one single period a week for the first semester. Three credits. Miss Jones.
  • Home Economics 334. Home Decoration. Application of design and art principles to the planning, decorating, furnishing, landscaping and construction of a model home. Traditional and contemporary styles are studied. Three periods a week for the seconds semester. Three credits. Miss Beeler.
  • Home Economics 335. Family Health. Guidance in meeting family problems related to maintenance of health and care during illness. Review of recent research in family health problems. Two periods a week for the first semester. Two credits. Miss Jones.
  • Home Economics 336. Child Growth and Development. Principles applicable in the development of the child, with emphasis on care and guidance. Experience with young children is provided through observation and participation in a community nursery school. Two single periods and one double period a week for the second semester. Three credits. Miss Jones.
  • Home Economics 338. Experimental Foods. A study of the chemical and physical factors affecting the quality of the cooked product; analysis of standard recipes and procedures and an evaluation for the results when methods and materials are varied. Review of recent research in foods. One single and two double periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Miss Beeler.

400-level

  • Home Economics 400. Home Management Economics and Residence. Objectives of homemaking. Management of time, energy, and money in relation to family needs. Standards of living; community resources, family income and patterns of expenditures. Experience in group living. Four lectures per week concurrent with nine weeks’ residence in the Home Management House. Six credits. Miss Beeler.
  • Home Economics 413, 414. Costume Design. A creative approach based on original design and consideration of the work of the fashion world. The development of appreciation of line, form, texture and color through design. Two double periods and one single periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mrs. Jamison.
  • Home Economics 421. Nutrition and Dietetics. Seminar. Discussion of the principles of human nutrition with emphasis on methods and procedures for improving the nutrition of children. Two single periods and one double period a week. Three credits. Miss Harris.
  • Home Economics 422. Diet Therapy. Prerequisites: Biology 382, Home Economics 231. The normal diet and its modifications to meet the demands of abnormal conditions. Survey of nutrition research in general nutrition, child nutrition and in diet in disease. Two single periods and one double period weekly in the hospital dietary department. Three credits. Mrs. Harris.
  • Home Economics 423. Institutional Organization and Management. Problems, theory and practice of institutional management relative to personnel, quantity production of foods, schedules, and dispatching of work. Three single periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Miss Beeler.
  • Home Economics 424. Quantity Cookery. Experience in planning, selecting, purchasing, preparing and serving of food in quantity. One single and two double periods in various food service institutions. Three credits. Miss Beeler.
  • Home Economics 426. Seminar in Foods and Nutrition. Reports and discussions of outstanding nutritional research and investigations. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1965-1966.) Mrs. Harris.
  • Home Economics 431. Modern Marriage. Concepts of the development of modern family life. The expanding, contracting and interaction dynamics of families in changing times. Three periods a week. Three credits. Miss Beeler.
  • Home Economics 432. Family Relations. Marriage and the family in our social order; factors contributing to marital success or failure, relationships between parents and children, brothers and sisters, and the various stages of the family life cycle from birth to old age. Three periods a week. Three credits. Miss Beeler.
  • Home Economics 441. Consumer Economics. Problems involved in the selection and purchase of goods and services required by individuals and families. Sources of information; governmental and other agencies serving the consumer; social responsibilities of consumers. Three periods a week. Three credits. Miss Beeler.