English

  • Professor James H. Croushore, Chairman
  • Professors Simpson, Whidden
  • Associate Professors B. W. Early, Griffith, W. B. Kelly, Lowry, S. H. Mitchell, D. H. Woodward*
  • Assistant Professors Brown, M. Houston, Kenvin, N. Mitchell, N. Wishner*
  • Instructors Case, Dilligan, M. S. Early, Glover, Pharr, Sarvay

Welcome to the English major!

Six hours of freshman English are prerequisite to all other English courses. Students choosing to major in English must take at least twenty-four credits in English courses numbered 300 or higher and twelve credits in related fields, in addition to the twelve hours of English listed in the degree requirements. The twenty-four hours in advanced English courses must include six hours in courses numbered 300- 326; six hours in courses numbered 335 to 366; six hours in 400 courses.

A student whom the department accepts as a major is required to follow a reading program designed to supplement the reading assigned in specific courses. This supplementary reading should be done at any time during a student’s junior and senior years. Reports on this reading must be submitted by May 15 of each year.

It is recommended that English majors who plan to do graduate work take two foreign languages, preferably French and German.

The twelve credits of related study are to be selected, with the approval of the student’s adviser, from among the courses numbered 200 or higher in the following departments; six credits must be offered from a single department; the remaining six must be offered from one or more other departments: Art (courses in art history), Classics, Dramatic Arts (courses in dramatic literature), History, Languages, Liberal Arts Seminars, Music (courses in the history and literature of music), Philosophy (except Philosophy 411), Religion (including Religion 101).

Offered Courses:

100-level

  • English 111-112. Composition and Reading. The mechanics of writing and an introduction to literature. To earn credit for the course, the student must have a passing average in her theme program. Three periods a week Six credits. Staff.
  • English 113-114. Composition and Reading. The mechanics of writing and an introduction to literature for students whose records reveal unusual ability in English. Enrollment is by consent of the department. Three periods a week. Six credits. Staff.

200-level

  • English 201,202. Journalism. An historical survey of mass communication with special emphasis on its role in contemporary society. Three periods a week. Three credits a semester. (Not offered in 1965-1966.) Mr. Houston.
  • English 203. Advanced Grammar. A study of the structure of the English language and of the relationship of certain philological principles and current usage. Three periods a week fore the second semester. Three credits. Mrs. Early.
  • English 205. Children’s Literature. A study of the various sections of children’s literature- fables; myths; folk, hero and realistic stories. Open to juniors and seniors only. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mrs. Early.
  • English 200, 121. Survey of English Literature. Literary movements and types from Beowulf to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits when offered to satisfy basic requirements. Miss Case, Mr. Dilligan, Mr. Early, Mr. Kelly, Miss Sarvay.
  • English 221, 222. Survey of American Literature. American backgrounds and literary movements and types from the colonial writers to the present. Three periods a week. Six credits when offered to satisfy basic requirements. Mr. Griffith, Mr. Lowry, Miss Pharr.
  • English 231. Short Fiction. A study of selected short fiction of the Western World. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Brown, Miss Case.
  • English 232. The Novel. A study of selected novels of the Western World. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Glover, Mrs. Mitchell.
  • English 233. Poetry. A close analysis of poetic form and content. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. Dilligan, Mrs. Mitchell
  • English 234. Shakespeare. A study of Shakespeare’s achievement in selected plays and poems. Not recommended for English majors. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mrs. Mitchell, Mr. Mitchell, Miss Sarvay.
  • English 235. Tragedy. Tragedy as form and idea reflected in selected literary and dramatic works of world literature. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Miss Sarvay.
  • English 236. Comedy and Satire. A study of comic and satiric conventions in selected works of world literature. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Croushore.

300-level

  • English 305. The English Language. The structure and history of the English language. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mrs. Mitchell.
  • English 308. Old and Middle English Literature in Translation. A study of some of the major works and genres of Anglo-Saxon and Middle English literature, including lyric, heroic and romance narratives and dram. Knowledge of the languages is not required. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Miss Sarvay.
  • English 315, 316. The English Renaissance. The non-dramatic poetry and prose of the Elizabethan, Jacobean and Caroline periods. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Woodward, Mr. Croushore.
  • English 325, 326. Eighteenth Century Literature, 1660-1880. A study of the main types of literature in England from the Restoration through the Eighteenth century, with particular attention to the development of neoclassical values and their decline and the rise of romanticism. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Kelly.
  • English 335, 336. Ninteenth Century English Literature. First semester, Romantic poetry and prose; second semester, Victorian poetry and prose. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Brown, Mr. Early, Mr. Glover.
  • English 355,356. Nineteenth Century American Literature. First semester, literary romanticism in American prose and poetry; second semester, literary realism in American prose and poetry. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Glover, Mr. Griffith, Mr. Lowry.
  • English 365, 366. Modern Literature. A comparative study of important European, British, and American authors from 1885 to the present. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Wishner.

400-level

  • English 406. Workshop in Writing. Practice in creative expression. Admission by consent of the instructor. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Kenvin.
  • English 422. Chaucer. Chaucer’s literary backgrounds and his major works. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Miss Sarvay.
  • English 415, 416. The Novel. Development of the novel in England and American. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Mitchell, Mr. Croushore.
  • English 417, 418. English Drama. The origin and development of drama from the middle Ages. First semester, Middle Ages to the Restoration; second semester, the Restoration to the present. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Whidden, Mr. Early.
  • English 425, 426. Shakespeare. Shakespeare’s development as a dramatist. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. Mr. Kenvin, Mr. Whidden.
  • English 436. Seventeenth Century Studies. Intensive study of significant figures, movements or problems in the literature of the seventeenth century. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Woodward.
  • English 445. Eighteenth Century Studies. Intensive study of significant figures, movements or problems in the literature of the eighteenth century. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Kely.
  • English 455. Ninteenth Century English Studies. Intensive study of significant figures, movements or problems in nineteenth century English literature. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. Mr. Brown, Mr. Early.
  • English 466 Twentieth Century English Studies. An intensive study of a few modern writers. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. Mr. Brown, Mr. Mitchell.
  • English 475. Ninteenth Century American Studies. Intensive investigation of significant figures, movements of problems in nineteenth century literature. Three periods a week. Three credits for the first semester. Mr. Croushore, Mr. Glover.
  • English 486. Twentieth Century American Studies. Intensive investigation of significant figures, movements of problems in twentieth century literature. Three periods a week. Three credits for the second semester. Mr. Lowry.